Real Deals: This Week’s Sales and Discounts on Natural Products You Really Use

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This week’s top deals:

 

mrh

Summer Recipe Sale at Mountain Rose Herbs.  Get 25% off select items now through August 16, 2015.

iron skillet

List Price $26.95  On Sale $14.97  Lodge LCS3 Pre-Seasoned Cast-Iron Chef’s Skillet, 10-inch.  Get FREE shipping with qualifying order. (Stephanie’s note: I have this pan and I LOVE it.)
bibs

List Price $32.77 On Sale $22.75  Matimati Baby Bandana Drool Bibs, Unisex 4-Pack Absorbent Cotton, Cute Baby Gift for Boys & Girls (Arrows & Triangles). Get FREE shipping with qualifying order.
snapList Price $66.99 On Sale $38.82  Snap Circuits SC-300 Electronics Discovery Kit.  Qualifies for FREE shipping.

burtAs Low As $5.19-$5.80  Burt’s Bees Sensitive Facial Cleanser, 6 Fluid Ounces.  On sale for $7.19.  Save 15% when you clip the coupon.  Save an additional 5-15% with Subscribe & Save.  Get FREE shipping with qualifying order.

bodysuitList Price $24.99 On Sale $9.99  Touched By Nature Organic Short Sleeved Bodysuit 3-Pack  

madeonlotion

FREE Heavenly Homemaker’s Guide to Gardening & Preserving with any MadeOn purchase over $10 for the month of August. 

BHS

Bulk Herb Store

Better Than Black Friday Summer Sale at Bulk Herb Store.  Sale ends August 15, 2015

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA60% Off  Tropical Traditions Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil for Hair Treatment.  Just $9.99/16 oz.  Sale ends Sunday, August 16, 2015. 

 

cumin30% Off Tropical Traditions Black Cumin Seed Oil.  Just $40.60.  Sale ends Sunday, August 16, 2015

breath35% Off Tropical Traditions Organic Herbal Breath Spray.  Just $9.99.  Sale ends Sunday, August 16, 2015

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA40% Off  Tropical Traditions Moisturizing Lotions.  Sale ends Thursday, August 13, 2015.

 

concentrateBuy 1 Get 1 FREE  Coconut Cream Concentrate 16 oz at Tropical Traditions.  Just $20 for 2 pints.  Sale ends Thursday, August 13, 2015

 

FREE Kindle eBooks:

babyfoodHealthy Homemade Baby Food: How to make Natural and Organic Baby Food with Delicious Recipes

miniMinimalist Money Management: 31 Money-Saving, Debt-Reducing Strategies that Simplify Your Financial Life
clutterClutter Free lifestyle: Smart organizing tips to keep your home decluttered, tidy and happy

Kindle eBooks for Less Than $1:

diyDIY Household Hacks: Make Natural Cleaners! Learn the Most Effective, Organic and Essential Green Cleaning Recipes

This week’s best coupons:

real-deals-pinterest-aug-11

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Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. When you buy through our links, we earn a small commission, which helps to keep this site going so that we can continue to offer free and useful content, so thanks!
About prices: Though we do our very best to post only current deals and prices and to let you know when offers expire, companies can and do change their prices and offers at their own discretion, and we have no control over this. If you notice that a deal has changed, please let us know and we’ll change the post to alert other readers that something is no longer available. Thanks for understanding!

Save Money with Perennials In Your Flower Garden

To stretch my flower gardening budget, I choose to save money with perennials because they’ll come back year after year – and they’ll multiply.

By Hilary Bernstein, Contributing Writer

I love flowers. But if I try to stick to a budget when gardening, I’d rather focus my spending on vegetables that will feed my family instead of flowers.

To stretch my flower gardening budget, I choose perennials because they’ll come back year after year – and they’ll multiply.

To stretch my flower gardening budget, I choose to save money with perennials because they’ll come back year after year – and they’ll multiply.

How to save money with perennials

This is the perfect time of year to search for perennial sales at your local garden center.

Greenhouses want to sell their merchandise before the weather gets colder, and many garden centers offer drastic discounts on their perennials. Each fall I find sales from 25 to 50 percent off the normal price.

A thriftier way to spruce up your garden is to take transplants from your gardener friends, family, or neighbors. It may take time and patience to wait for your transplants to become established (isn’t that just part of gardening!?), but it’s well worth it.

To stretch my flower gardening budget, I choose to save money with perennials because they’ll come back year after year – and they’ll multiply.

If you already have perennials, dividing your own is a fantastic way to multiply your plants. To successfully divide your perennials, the process is fairly easy (get ready to cut apart the roots with a sharp shovel!) — the important thing is to know the right timing and right technique. That timing and technique varies with each unique plant.

You can find helpful gardening information at:

My 5 favorite perennials

I’ve tried many perennials when gardening. Some spread much too invasively, like Walker’s Low catmint, bishop weed, or crown vetch.

Others perform year after year. Here are my five favorites:

To stretch my flower gardening budget, I choose to save money with perennials because they’ll come back year after year – and they’ll multiply.

1. Hostas.

So many kinds of hostas are available. You can choose the size of leaves you prefer, or mix and match varieties. They take a few years to look lush, but are easy to divide.

To stretch my flower gardening budget, I choose to save money with perennials because they’ll come back year after year – and they’ll multiply.

2. Coneflowers, Black-Eyed Susans and Shasta Daisies.

Even though the purplish-pink, bright yellow and white flowers all are different, the three perennials seem a lot alike to me. They bloom beautifully (for a long time), they grow quickly, and will come back year after year. While they’re pretty in landscapes, coneflowers, black-eyed Susans and Shasta daisies all make beautiful cut flower bouquets to brighten up your home.

To stretch my flower gardening budget, I choose to save money with perennials because they’ll come back year after year – and they’ll multiply.

3. Lamium.

Lamium (also called dead nettle) is an attractive ground cover – I like the purple dragon variety. It grows quickly but isn’t invasive, and it brightens up shady areas.

To stretch my flower gardening budget, I choose to save money with perennials because they’ll come back year after year – and they’ll multiply.

4. Ferns.

Ferns take a while to grow and multiply, but they’re so pretty in shady gardens.

To stretch my flower gardening budget, I choose to save money with perennials because they’ll come back year after year – and they’ll multiply.

5. Day Lilies.

Like hostas, day lilies come in a variety of colors and sizes. They’re all pretty. Day lilies flourish when they’re divided every couple years.

To stretch my flower gardening budget, I choose to save money with perennials because they’ll come back year after year – and they’ll multiply.

What are your favorite perennials? How do you like to save money with perennials in your garden?

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. When you buy through our links, we earn a small commission, which helps to keep this site going so that we can continue to offer free and useful content, so thanks!

Weekend Links

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Links for this week:

“I don’t know how you do this every day.” @ Coffee + Crumbs

Longing To Say Less @ SheLoves Magazine

Ajiaco – A Columbian Chicken Soup @ The Nourishing Gourmet

Greater Riches Than Wealth @ Becoming Minimalist

How Choosing Gratitude is Changing Our Home @ Money Saving Mom

Essential Oil Cooling Spray for Summer @ Wellness Mama

One simple way to figure out which criticism to listen to. @ Jon Acuff

You Can’t Live As If You Only Had Three Months to Live @ The Art of Non-Conformity

August Sponsors

Are you looking for companies that share the same values you do? Here at Keeper of the Home we curate a fabulous selection of companies that fit well with our audience. Here are our sponsors this month!

Plan to Eat | Eating at Home is About to Get Easier

EntreFamily | lead an uncommon life

Tropical Traditions | America’s Source for Coconut Oil

MadeOn Hard Lotion | Hard Lotion For Dry Skin

The Healthy Lunchbox | Sandwich-free Secrets to Packing a Real Food Lunch

School is beginning again! When do your kids start?

Ditch the Bag of Chips: 15 Healthier Ideas for Lunches

Love crunchy and salty chips, but need a healthy alternative? Here's 15 healthy ideas to replace potato chips in your lunches!

photo credit

By Andrea Green, Contributing Writer

I love chips. Crisp and salty, chips just seem to be the perfect side to pack up for lunch.

What I don’t love about chips are the levels of acrylamide – a cancer causing chemical found in many brands of pre-packaged chips.

The good news is, you can still have a crunchy, crispy, salty and tasty addition to your lunch. You just have to think outside the chip box.

15 Healthier Ideas for Lunches

Vegetable chips can be a great substitute for bags of chips, and making vegetable chips at home is actually quite easy.

Investing in a dehydrator is a great way to make vegetable chips at home.  Try searching craigslist, eBay or your local Goodwill, and chances are you will find a great deal on a dehydrator.

You can have a crunchy, crispy, salty and tasty addition to your lunch. You just have to think outside the chip box for healthier ideas for lunches.

These dehydrator recipes all make delicious additions to lunches:

1. Crispy Green Bean Chips — Make up a batch of these for an awesome crisp and crunchy lunch addition.

2. Kale Chips — Two great ways to make these chip substitutes – oven and dehydrator.

3. Salt and Pepper Zucchini Chips — This is a family friendly recipe that makes good use of plentiful zucchini.

4. Sweet Potato Chips — Dehydrate sweet potatoes to make a tasty treat without any oils.

5. Beet Chips — You won’t miss your bag of chips if you pack up these sweet and crunchy beet chips.

6. Tomato Chips — These chips are perfect for the tomato lovers in your house.

You can have a crunchy, crispy, salty and tasty addition to your lunch. You just have to think outside the chip box for healthier ideas for lunches.

If you don’t have a dehydrator, don’t despair. There are lots of tasty recipes that use your oven to make up delicious lunch additions.

7. Chili Flavored Crispy Roasted Chickpeas — The flavor and crunch of these chickpeas make them highly addictive.

8. Oven Fried Garlic Parmesan Green Beans — Try these green beans that are baked – not fried – but totally delicious.

9. Plantain Fries — Here’s a great recipe to try if dietary restrictions limit your potato intake.

10. Apple Chips — Homemade apple chips are an addictive lunch addition.

You can have a crunchy, crispy, salty and tasty addition to your lunch. You just have to think outside the chip box for healthier ideas for lunches.

11. Homemade Corn Chips — These corn chips taste even better than the store bought version.

12. Baked Butternut Squash Chips  —A little bit sweet, a little bit salty, totally delicious chip substitute.

13. Popcorn — Homemade popcorn is so inexpensive and a fantastic replacement for a bag of chips.

14. Lemon Pepper Brussels Sprouts Chips — You may think you don’t like Brussels Sprouts, but this chip will change your mind.

15. Carrot Chips — Make these with different colored carrots from the farmer’s market.

What are your favorite chip substitutes?

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. When you buy through our links, we earn a small commission, which helps to keep this site going so that we can continue to offer free and useful content, so thanks!

4 Sure-Fire Tips to Help Picky Eaters Actually Eat That Healthy School Lunch

Here are three sure-fire strategies I've found for helping picky eaters actually eat that healthy school lunch waiting for them in their backpack.

By Kresha Faber, Contributing Writer

There’s an unspoken stigma amongst moms these days, namely “picky eaters are created by moms who cater to their kid’s every whim.” Or better said, your kid wouldn’t be a picky eater if you didn’t LET him be.

And while an element of this certainly may be true, picky eating isn’t quite that simple.

Sure, the concept of a “picky eater” is largely a first-world one. But that doesn’t mean it’s not REAL or not worth our attention. Nor does it diminish the frustration and anguish of parents who deal with children who are picky eaters.

What Causes Picky Eating?

Picky eating shows up in affluent upper-class homes as well as those who fill their pantries via the food bank and food stamps – there’s no one group that has the “market cornered” on picky eating.

Also, picky eaters come about for a number of reasons, which range from psychological to hormonal to relational to behavioral. This is why often toddlers will love a certain food, then suddenly when they turn two or three, won’t touch that favorite food for anything. For my five-year-old, it’s currently zucchini. Last year he would eat an entire zucchini on his own, but this year as we’ve begun pulling our treasures out of the garden, he won’t touch it, even though he helps harvest it and he’s proud as peaches of getting to carry them all into the house.

I appreciate this quote from Dr. Sears (even though I would also insert “grow” next to the word “buy”):

“We now realize that our job is simply to buy the right food, prepare it nutritiously…, and serve it creatively… we’ve learned to take neither the credit nor the blame if our children go through a picky eater stage.” (source)

Basically, what I’m trying to say is that we need to exercise a bit of grace towards each other (and our children), then dive in and get excited about helping our children delight in their food, while setting a few guidelines along the way.

The key is to remember that picky eating WILL pass. It may not be until adulthood (as Stephanie has written about so wonderfully) or it may be next year, but it WILL pass. In the meantime, continuing to offer those foods that are assumed to be verboten is absolutely important. It can sometimes take up to 40 times of being exposed to something new before we even “see” it, and the same is true with tastes and textures. In our house, we have the rule that you have to take at least one bite of everything at each meal, even if every time you decide you still don’t like it.

Here are three sure-fire strategies I've found for helping picky eaters actually eat that healthy school lunch waiting for them in their backpack.

The Bigger Picture

Food should be fun! I’m not advocating playing with food and making a mess (except on purpose), but I am saying that the MUCH BIGGER PICTURE is that we’re in the business of teaching our children to delight in mealtimes and to delight in their food, which will ultimately result in a much healthier relationship with food. If mealtimes descend into battlegrounds on a regular basis, this is quashed and food choices are more about the power struggle than about enjoying each other’s company around a meal.

If that’s the case in your family, perhaps try resetting your dinnertime by removing the central focus from the food itself and focusing more on telling stories around the dinner table, laughing together, and setting very simple rules you know your children can meet so that everyone looks forward to mealtime more, your kiddos become more confident by regularly accomplishing their goals, and in that environment become more open to trying new things.

And if you’re worried about your child because you’re afraid he’s missing out on certain nutrients, get creative. Did you know pineapple and kiwi have more Vitamin C than oranges? Or that bell peppers, other brightly colored vegetables, and even red palm oil have equal or more beta carotene than carrots? What I’m saying is that there are multiple ways to get a wide-complement of vitamins and minerals into your child’s diet through whole foods and your child will likely eat at least one of them (even if that may require pureeing it in a sauce or serving it up in a popsicle).

But What About When My Child is Away from Home?

Now – we’ve also got a second hurdle to deal with. It’s one thing to deal with a picky eater at home when you can be present at meals and encourage him or her to try new foods, but what do you do when your child is away from home – namely school or camp?

Here are three sure-fire strategies I’ve found for helping picky eaters actually eat that healthy school lunch waiting for them in their backpack. Of course, not every single one will work for your child, but I’ve purposely called them “sure-fire” because I’ve seen nearly every child who has tried them become more adventurous in their eating habits over the course of a few weeks or months.

And if they don’t, there’s one more idea listed at the end. :)

I can’t wait to hear how these strategies work for you!

By the way, these tips are from my brand-new e-book, Healthy School Lunches Made Simple, a book I’ve been working on for years and that I am BEYOND thrilled to finally be able to share with you all!

Since you’re hearing about the book here at Keeper of the Home, a site I love passionately, I’m offering a special, additional bonus just for Keeper of the Home readers. Click here to check out the book – and use code SCHOOLROCKSATKOTH to get 25% off through this weekend (ends Sunday night, Aug. 9, at midnight PST).

Here are three sure-fire strategies I've found for helping picky eaters actually eat that healthy school lunch waiting for them in their backpack.

4 Sure-Fire Tips for Getting Your Picky Eater to Eat Your Healthy School Lunch

#1. Make it intriguing.

  • Use a toothpick and a triangle of cheese to turn a deviled egg into a boat.
  • Any food on a skewer is more fun.
  • Tie it in a pretty package – this can be as simple as parchment paper and a fabric ribbon.
  • Dip turns any food into a party.
  • Cut the foods in fun shapes, such as watermelon into stars and serve with blueberries or cut hearts out of a tortilla and layer it like lasagna with any filling.

#2. Go for sensory eating.

Have all the foods in the lunch match with a common sensory theme, like:

  • Every food is the same color. (An all red lunch, anyone?)
  • Every food is the same texture. (All spoonable or all crunchy, etc.)
  • Every food is from the same origin. (All food from the ocean or everything is from your garden, etc.)
  • Include one food from each sense (One smells amazing, one makes an interesting sound when you bite it, one feels interesting, one looks alluring, and one tastes amazing – maybe the last one is their favorite food). These can be more simple than it sounds!

#3. Include your child in making the lunch.

When children are emotionally and physically involved in preparing what they eat, they’re far more invested in it. Thus, they’re much more likely to take a few bites and maybe even polish off what they’ve packed.

But My Child is Still Picky! What Do I Do?

For those of you whose kids plain, flat-out refuse to eat what you send in their lunchbox, here’s one more strategy to help your child venture into new territory. (Important: I’m assuming your child is at least school-age for this strategy – this one is not appropriate for toddlers or preschoolers.)

#4. Change the Focus.

This strategy is best used when you as a parent have been dealing with picky eating for a long time and you feel exhausted, or at a time when your child has been particularly stubborn for an extended period of time. It removes focus from food and focuses instead on teaching important life lessons.

Let’s break this down a little bit. If you’re at this point, food has become a point of contention, a tug-of-war, or a power struggle with your child – and obviously, I’m assuming there aren’t any food allergies, abuse issues, or other bigger issues at play here.

Therefore, the change in behavior and the acceptance to try something new CANNOT come from within that struggle or frustration. Or better said, it can’t be about the food, even though we’re using food as the medium and the end goal is to change your child’s thinking about food.

Most of all, remember this: this is one of many hurdles that will present itself along the parenting journey. Infuse it with joy, creativity, and patience for the journey and you’ll be setting both you and your child up with GREAT tools for tackling all the hurdles that lie ahead.

So first, talk to your child. Obviously, make this age-appropriate, but describe how food works in our body, why you make the type of food you do, etc. With older children, you can even describe your frustrations or concerns, if appropriate, although keep your tone positive. Chiding won’t help this process!

Second, listen. Ask them why they like the food they do. If you child is able to express their likes, listen for cues that communicate a sensory preference (i.e. they only mention crunchy foods, foods of a certain hue, or foods that can be eaten with hands), a relationship (“I like Daddy’s omelets”), etc. You likely already know these, but it’s still beneficial to your children to feel heard and to be able to verbalize their preferences. Plus, you might hear something new.

Third, set a goal together and make a plan to reach that goal. Agree on a goal regarding trying new foods or setting new food habits (e.g. taking one bite of everything for five days in a row), then make a plan for reaching that goal (even something simple like a sticker chart to mark progress), and lastly, offer an incentive for meeting that goal. Note: THIS INCENTIVE CANNOT BE FOOD, OR EVEN ANYTHING PHYSICAL. IT MUST BE RELATIONAL. For example, a good incentive will be “I’ll take you to the Carousel on Saturday” or “You can stay up half-an-hour late on Friday and we’ll watch a movie.” This may NOT be, “If you meet your goal, we’ll have extra dessert” or “you may have a special piece of chocolate when you get home on Friday.”

The reason for this is because when you are at your wit’s end, your child must know that your love and respect for them has nothing to do with to how well they do or do not eat their meals. Which is true, right? You may be frustrated, annoyed, or even angry, but your love certainly doesn’t hinge on an empty lunchbox!

Thus, you can help instill a new habit (e.g. trying new foods) by tying it EMOTIONALLY to the positive experience of working to meet a goal and celebrating that success together. This is also why you can’t tie it to a physical non-food incentive, such as “if you eat all your lunch, I’ll buy you a new book” or “if you bring home an empty lunchbox, we’ll go get a new Lego set to add to your collection.” This MUST be tied to relationship. (Now, if the new Lego set comes with an entire morning of playing Lego together, perhaps that’s a different story!)

The second part of this is not only to instill the ability to eat new foods, but for your child to gain the confidence and skill that comes with the satisfaction of working toward a goal, even if it’s hard. This is a LIFE lesson and happens to use food as its medium. However, as I mentioned at the beginning of the article, we’re also wanting to help them learn how to delight in their food and their food choices. This – again – is why this MUST be tied to relationship, as these life lessons will be repeated over and over again through your child’s growing years.

And again, remember, in this strategy, your role is that of cheerleader! It’s like learning to ride a bike: you can teach your child how to get up on the bike, how to pedal, and you can run behind holding on, but ultimately, they have to ride the bike by themselves. So cheer your child on enthusiastically!

Okay, let me sum up this strategy:

  • Talk and listen to your child (at least school-age – this strategy is not for toddlers or preschoolers).
  • Set a food-related goal (make it small, do-able, and repetitive, as the whole point is to establish a new habit).
  • Agree on a relationship-based incentive and cheer your child on along the way.

Have you helped your picky eaters learn new food habits? If so, tell us how YOU did it in the comments below!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. When you buy through our links, we earn a small commission, which helps to keep this site going so that we can continue to offer free and useful content, so thanks!

3-Ingredient Mango Ice Cream

This recipe for mango ice cream is like a frozen tropical paradise! Not only that, it's dairy-free and free of additives and added sugar.

Guest Post by Allison of Kale Cuties

I LOVE ice cream! I mean, WHO DOESN’T? Isn’t that why there’s a whole song about it? :)

Unfortunately, my carefree enjoyment for ice cream came to a halt around my freshmen year of college when my doctor confirmed a dairy allergy. Going dairy-free was hard and meant usually going without. The few times I did give into my cravings my JOY for this cold creamy treat was short lived as bloating, stomach cramping and even allergy like symptoms would soon follow.

My two options were to go without ice cream or to pay $7 a quart for a dairy-free alternative. Needless to say, we went without more often than not. :(

But, my love for this refreshing treat just kept calling my name. And so, I headed to the kitchen determined to create a cheaper, healthier, cleaner dairy-free option.

MANGOS + BANANAS + LEMON JUICE = TROPICAL PARADISE

It’s cool and creamy just the way ice cream should be. Best of all there is no added sugar! The mangos and bananas add enough sweet flavor that will leave your taste buds asking for more.

Not only is this recipe clean, it’s ridiculously EASY to make. In 10 minutes or less, you can also enjoy this refreshing treat with those you love. You can totally skip the freezer part of this recipe and just drink like a smoothie.

How to prepare mango

So before you run away (because, let’s face it, mangos can be intimidating), let me show you the easiest and quickest way to get the great taste of mango into your belly. And it doesn’t involve buying another kitchen tool that you will only use once a year!

Here’s what you’ll want to do…

First cut around your mango pit making large slices. You’ll just need to feel around the pit when making cuts.

This recipe for mango ice cream is like a frozen tropical paradise! Not only that, it's dairy-free and free of additives and added sugar.

Next, take a glass or cup and place a large slice of mango so the mango is sitting on the lip of the glass. You’ll want the flesh of the mango facing towards the inside of the cup. With one hand hold the glass, while the other hand is pulling the mango down the side of the cup by the peel.

This recipe for mango ice cream is like a frozen tropical paradise! Not only that, it's dairy-free and free of additives and added sugar.

Repeat until all the mango is peeled. This whole process literally took me 2 minutes.

Mango Ice Cream

Now that you know how to handle your mango, here’s how to make your own Mango Ice Cream:

5 from 1 reviews
3-Ingredient Mango Ice Cream
 
Serves: 3-4 servings
Ingredients
  • 2 ripe large mangos
  • 2 ripe bananas (frozen or unfrozen will work)
  • 1 tbsp. fresh squeezed lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Begin by cutting around your mango, making large slices around the pit. Peel your mango once slice at a time until all the skin is removed. (See above for a super fast way) If you want, you can also cut more mango flesh off around the pit of your mango. Place mango in the blender, but wait to blend.
  2. Peel bananas and place in blender. If using frozen bananas you will need to run the bananas under hot water or place them in the microwave for 30 seconds so that the peel is easier to take off.
  3. Cut lemon in half and squeeze juice into a bowl until you have 1 tbsp. of lemon juice reserved. Place lemon juice into blender.
  4. Blend all ingredients together until mixture is smooth in texture. Place smooth mango mixture into a freezer safe container with lid and freeze for at least 4 hours or for overnight.
  5. * If you have leftovers or are making the ice cream ahead of time, remove mango ice cream from the freezer and allow it to sit on the counter for 30 minutes before serving. This will allow the ice cream to soften.

Bio.ProfilepicAllison is the creator of kalecuties.com, a wife, mother of 2, and follower of Jesus. I love vintage decor, lazy days at the lake, bargain shopping, thunderstorms during the day, a good book, bodyweight exercises, and experimenting in the kitchen especially when I don’t have to clean it up. Connect with me more on Facebook, Pinterest, or Twitter.

Real Deals: This Week’s Sales and Discounts on Natural Products You Really Use

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This week’s top deals:

7th genOn Sale $22.99 ($0.03/count) Seventh Generation Thick & Strong Free and Clear Baby Wipes, 768 Count

oilJust $6.45-$7.21  BetterBody Foods Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil,15.5 Ounce is on sale for $7.59.  Save 5-15% with Subscribe & Save.  Get FREE shipping with qualifying order.

$3 Off Jessica Fisher’s The Print & Go Planner eBook OR A Month of Meals: Make-Ahead Meals   Use Coupon code keeper3. (Discount good until August 15th.)

babyganics

Just $12.92-$15.27.  ($4.31-$5.09/16 oz bottle)  Babyganics Baby Shampoo + Body Wash, Fragrance Free, 16oz Pump Bottle (Pack of 3) is on sale for $23.49.   Save 30% when you clip the coupon (you must be logged in).  Save an additional 5-15% with Subscribe & save.  Get FREE shipping with qualifying order.

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Just $11.57-$13.16 ($0.36-$0.41/roll)   Cottonelle Clean Care Toilet Paper, Double Roll, 4 Count (Pack of 8) is on sale for $15.96.  Save $2 when you clip the coupon (you must be logged in).  Save an additional 5-15% with Subscribe & Save.  Get FREE shipping with qualifying order.

yoga

Just $16.99 with coupon!  Spoga Premium 5/8″ Extra Thick 71″ Long High Density Exercise Yoga Mat with Comfort Foam and Carrying Straps is on sale for $19.99 Save an additional $3 when you clip the coupon (you must be logged in).  Get FREE shipping with qualifying order.

popsList Price $24.95  On Sale $11.99  KitchCo Silicone Ice Pop/Popsicle Molds – Flexible & Durable for Mess-Free Freezing & Easy Cleanup (Set of 8).  Get FREE shipping with qualifying ordermonitorList Price $129.99 On Sale $95.92  Summer Infant In View Digital Color Video Baby Monitor.  Qualifies for FREE shipping

bulletList Price $22.99 On Sale $15.99  Newisland Eco-Friendly Material Soft Bullet Big League Blaster   Get FREE shipping with qualifying order.

puppy
List Price $20.00 On Sale $14.24  Haba Pudgie Puppy Figure – Pure Nature Organic  Get FREE shipping with qualifying order.

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List Price $25.00 On Sale $19.95  Organic Cloth Paper Towels Cleaning Cloth – Set of 6 11×11 in Orange.  Get FREE shipping with qualifying order

tt oil

40% Off Certified Organic Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil 5 Gallon from Tropical Traditions.  Sale ends Thursday, August 6, 2015

syrup

30% Off Organic Maple Syrup at Tropical Traditions.  Sale ends Sunday, August 9, 2015.  Only $18.00/16 oz glass jar.

lip

Buy 1 Get 1 FREE Organic Lip Moisturizers.  Try unscented, cinnamon/peppermint, tea tree oil, orange/cinnamon, coconut, citrus, or vanilla.  Sale ends Sunday, August 9, 2015.

 

 

BHS

Don’t Miss This Upcoming Sale at Bulk Herb Store  August 8-15, 2015

FREE Kindle eBooks:

(Note: Prices can change without notice so please double check the price before purchasing)

smart parentSmart Parenting: A Complete Guide for Busy Parents Kindle Edition
first aidFirst Aid for Infants and Children: 30 Common Emergency Procedures to Save Your Child’s Health and Life Kindle Edition

saladsThe Salads Cookbook: 100 Delicious, Creative & Exquisite Salad Recipes To Enjoy (The Most Delicious Salad Recipes & Salad Dressings Cookbook Series) Kindle Edition
canningCanning and Preserving for Beginners: Teach Me Everything I Need To Know About Canning and Preserving In 30 Minutes (Prepping – Canning – Mason Jar Meals – Food Preservation – Survival Pantry) Kindle Edition

This week’s best coupons:

real-deals-pinterest-aug-4

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Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. When you buy through our links, we earn a small commission, which helps to keep this site going so that we can continue to offer free and useful content, so thanks!
About prices: Though we do our very best to post only current deals and prices and to let you know when offers expire, companies can and do change their prices and offers at their own discretion, and we have no control over this. If you notice that a deal has changed, please let us know and we’ll change the post to alert other readers that something is no longer available. Thanks for understanding!

A Two-Week Summer Meal Plan

Getting bored with your usual recipes? or need more inspiration to use up seasonal fruits and veggies? Start with this Summer Meal Plan!

By Emily McClements, Contributing Writer

It’s the time of year where the local Farmer’s Markets and our gardens have begun to overflow with the season’s harvest which make it the perfect opportunity to incorporate a wide variety of produce into our meal plans!

I want my family to enjoy as many of the different fruits and vegetables that are in season right now as possible. My kids will easily devour an entire carton of raspberries or blueberries almost as soon as I wash them and set them out. But, they haven’t developed an appreciation for some of the other summer produce, like zucchini, tomatoes, and beets yet. I’m hoping that serving them lots of delicious produce in different ways this time of year will continue to expand their palates.

I’ve put together enough recipes for a two-week Summer Meal Plan to include as many of the flavors of the season as I could. Use these meals as a jumping off point to create your own Summer Meal Plan!

Summer Meal Plan

Breakfast

Start off your day right with all the fresh veggies and sweet and juicy fruits of the season!

Make double batches of the pancakes and muffins to use for quick and easy breakfasts next week. And feel free to repeat any of the quick and easy breakfasts if you need to.

Quick & Easy

  • Yogurt and granola with sliced peaches*
  • Smoothies with fresh fruit and veggies and scrambled eggs
  • Oatmeal with fresh blueberries and peaches

More Time, Worth the Effort!

For mornings when you have a little bit of time:

Lunch

My favorite lunches involve either eating dinner leftovers just as they are, or remaking leftovers into another delicious meal.

Dinner

I've put together enough recipes for a two-week Summer Meal Plan to include as many of the flavors of the season as I could.

Quick & Easy

More time, worth the effort!

These dinners take a little more time, but are definitely worth the effort!

Desserts

Snacks

Recipes above marked with * would be great for snacks too!

Getting bored with your usual recipes? or need more inspiration to use up seasonal fruits and veggies? Start with this Summer Meal Plan!

What’s your favorite recipe to use in a summer meal plan? Share it with us in the comments so we can all try it too!

 

Weekend Links

(keeperofthehome.org)

Got dry skin this summer?

I do, too. I’m an avid sandal wearer and in the heat, my feet tend to get drier than usual, even cracked sometimes.

If you’re like me, I think you’ll LOVE this extra special freebie that my friend Renee from MadeOn Lotion is offering only for Keeper of the Home readers! Her popular Au Chocolat lotion stick (which is my hands down favorite lotion scent) is creamy and nourishing and oh-so-yummy smelling, and she’ll send you one free for just the cost of shipping.

So long as you don’t try to eat it (no really, it smells that good, you’ll be sorely tempted), it will do your dry feet and hands a huge favor. Her all-natural lotion bars are the best thing I’ve ever used for my eczema-prone hands and they feel like no other lotion you’ve ever tried.

All you have to do to claim yours is click HERE, add it to your cart, and checkout (and there are a limited amount of lotions available, so act quickly if you want one!). If you’d like to get even the shipping free, you can make a $45 order, add this in, and you’re golden (hint: check out their Bug Block stick, and their Rash Cream!).

Get my free Au Chocolat lotion stick now!

freeauchocolat

Links for this week:

The unexpected gift of homeschooling @ Simple Homeschool

Convicted but Not Condemned @ (in)courage

Homemade Peach Lemonade @ Natural Fertility and Wellness

What I want you to know about what it’s like to be poor @ Rage Against the Minivan

on her last day on earth @ Sarah Thebarge

Crock Pot Baked Potato Bar @ The Humbled Homemaker

If we play God, world will be a lesser place @ StarTribune

How To Waste Your Motherhood (Thoughts After The Scariest Day Of My Life) @ Smartter Each Day

What’s your favorite part of summer?

How to Preserve {Pretty Much} Anything: Part 2

Need to preserve your food? Here are links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired)!

By Kresha Faber, Contributing Writer

Did you miss Part 1 of How to Preserve {Pretty Much} Anything?

Go right on over HERE to read it.

It will give you some fantastic information about:

  • Why we preserve food
  • The 7 types of food preservation
  • A note about safety
  • How to choose which method of preparation to use
  • Tips for getting equipped to start preserving

But today, I want to share with you just a few of my favorite preserving websites, recipes, tutorials, resources and inspirations!

Handy How-To’s

How to Blanch Vegetables from The Kitchn

How to Peel A Lot of Tomatoes Fast from Northwest Edible Life

Naked Peaches! How to Boil & Peel Them in a Flash from The Kitchn/Smitten Kitchen

How to Can: A Step-by-Step Guide from Frugal Living NW

How to Grow a Garden You’ll Actually Use

7 Simple Recipes For Preserving Edible Flowers

4 Easy Ways to Preserve Herbs

Harvesting and Preserving Herbs for the Home Gardener

Preserving Summer’s Bounty: Recipes and Tutorials to Keep You Busy Until Thanksgiving

10 Simple Steps to Prepare for Canning Season

Planning What to Preserve

When life hands you soggy pickles… make relish!

Need to preserve your food? Here are links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired)!

Helpful Sites for Preserving, Canning, and Fermenting

These guys KNOW food preservation – you’ll leave inspired every time. :)

Punk Domestics – these guys live, breathe, and laugh preserving and fermenting foods

Northwest Edible Life – urban homesteading, lots of preserving, and all-things gardening

Preserving Your Harvest – everything you need to know and more

Pick Your Own – I have no idea how well this site functions on a mobile phone, but it’s a wealth of information!

Traditional Cooking School – everything about traditional food, traditional preservation methods, and more

Nourished Kitchen – you can’t help but CELEBRATE traditional foods after visiting this site – the photos and the recipes are simply stunning

Hunter Angler Gardener Cook – Hank is an expert at home curing meats and game and preserving your food

Need to preserve your food? Here are links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired)!

Links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired!)

Eight Ways to Preserve Grapes

Preserving Your Horseradish Harvest

Preserving Strawberries

A Victorian Christmas: Using Seasonal and Preserved Foods at Christmas

My Humble Kitchen Recipe Guide to Canning and Preserving

What to do with a bounty of cherries (even the pits)

Need to preserve your food? Here are links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired)!

Freezing

How to Freeze and Save Garden Zucchini from Thriving Home

How to Freeze Eggs from The Prairie Homestead

Freeze & Preserve Fresh Herbs in Olive Oil and Two Ways To Freeze and Preserve Fresh Herbs from The Kitchn

How to Make Refried Beans in the Slow Cooker (and freeze them) from Nourishing Joy

Four Ways to Preserve Prickly Pear Pads from Root Simple

How to Preserve Beet Greens from Montana Homesteader

IHOP Blueberry Syrup from Laura Fuentes – she doesn’t mention freezing, but if you use tapioca starch or skip the starch altogether, freezing this syrup would be a great way to save a whole bunch of blueberries!

Need to preserve your food? Here are links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired)!

Dehydrating & Smoking

Homemade Vitamin C Powder from Nourishing Joy

Dehydrated Pasta Sauce from Thank Your Body

How to Braid Garlic and Onions from Rodale’s Organic Life

Green Veggie Powder from Nourished Kitchen

How to Dehydrate Mushrooms from Nourishing Joy

Sun-Dried Tomatoes from Little House Living

How to Dehydrate Fresh Figs from Nourishing Joy

Homemade Fruit Leather and Fruit Roll-Ups from Don’t Waste the Crumbs

How to Preserve Palm Dates from Garden Guides

How to Make Dried Cherries from Little House Living

Homemade Ground Meat Jerky — Not So Tough from Traditional Cooking School

Traditional Homemade Jerky from Alton Brown

How to Make DIY Bacon from Fine Cooking

Need to preserve your food? Here are links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired)!

Fermenting & Culturing

Old-Fashioned, Pound-Free, Lacto-Fermented Sauerkraut from The Nourishing Gourmet

Homemade Fish Sauce from Nourishing Joy

101 Fabulous Fermented Foods from Nourishing Joy

Lacto-Fermented Dilly Carrot Sticks from The Nourishing Gourmet

Fermented Hot Chili Sauce from Nourished Kitchen

How to Make Sriracha from Scratch from Serious Eats

Home-cured Cracked Olives from Nourished Kitchen

How to Make Easy Kimchi at Home from The Kitchn

Making Fermented Mushrooms from And Here We Are

Crisp & Crunchy Lacto-Fermented Pickled Asparagus from Nourishing Joy

Lacto-Fermented Cherry Salsa from Northwest Edible Life

Fermented Mixed Berries from Nourished Kitchen

How to Make Fig Butter from Nourishing Joy

How to Make Fermented Bananas from SkinVERSE

Fermented Rosehip Soda from And Here We Are

How to Ferment Capers and Olives

For capers:

Place your capers in a jar large enough so that the capers can be covered by at least an inch of water. Cover with water and soak for 7-10 days, draining and rinsing once a day. These will smell foul, the water each day will change color, and the capers will become drab-looking, but all of that’s good, as those are the signs that the bitter compounds are indeed leeching out into the water.

After 7-10 days, place capers in a clean jar and pour one of the following brines over the capers with enough to cover them by at least 1 inch. Let sit at room temperature for 7-14 days, then store in the refrigerator for up to 1 year.

Vinegar brine: for each 1 cup of brine, use 1/2 cup wine vinegar, 1/2 cup water, and 1 tablespoon salt

Salt brine: for each 1 cup of brine, use 1 cup water and 1 tablespoon salt

For olives:

Sort your fresh olives, removing any bruised fruits, stems, and leaves. Rinse.

Gentle whack each olive with a rolling pin or score it several times with a paring knife.

Once all the olives have been prepared, place them in a large container or several small containers and fill them with filtered water. (You’ll need to be able to lift and maneuvre this container, so don’t make it too huge.) Drain, rinse and fill the olive container with water again twice a day for 14-30 days. Begin tasting the olives after 14 days to decide how much bitterness you like. The longer you soak them, the less bitterness there will be, although it won’t be removed completely.

Once they are as you like, drain and rinse one last time, then place them in a new container and pour over wine vinegar and a salt brine in the following ratio:

Per one gallon of olives, use 1/2 cup wine vinegar, 3/4 cup salt, and 1 gallon water.

Shake or stir your olive container to combine ingredients well, then let sit at room temperature for 10-14 days. Store in the refrigerator for up to six months.

Need to preserve your food? Here are links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired)!

Canning

How to Invent Safe Food Preservation Recipes

Marinated red bell peppers from Culinate

Pickled Okra from Simply Recipes

Homemade Pickled Dilled Green Beans from Pick Your Own

How to Can Beans {The Nourishing Way} from Traditional Cooking School

Canning Stock for the Pantry from Heartland Rennaisance

Homemade, Cannable Marinara Sauce – No Pressure Canner Required from Heartland Rennaisance

How to Can Mandarin Oranges from Arctic Garden Studio

Honeyed Peaches and Nectarines from Little Miss Cruciferous

How to Pressure Can Leafy Greens (PDF) from Seattle Tilth

Meyer Lemon Marmalade from Simply Recipes

Jalapaño Pepper Jelly from Little House Living

Orange Rhubarb Jam from Simply Canning

Apple Pie Filling from Little House Living

Apple Butter from Simply Recipes

Green Tomato Chutney from Simply Recipes

Need to preserve your food? Here are links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired)!

Salt- and Sugar-Curing

DIY: Pickled Cherry Blossoms (Sakura) from Gardenista

Prickly Pear Jelly Recipe from Root Simple

Unusual Jelly Recipes: Rose Hip Jelly, Cranberry, Cactus Jelly, Sangria Jelly, Mint Jelly, Prickly Pear Jelly, Chokecherry Jelly, Etc. from Pick Your Own

Easy DIY Tonic Water from NW Edible Life

Pomegranate Molasses from Simply Recipes

How to Make Homemade Grenadine from The Kitchn

How to Make Homemade Grenadine from Jeffery Morganthaler

(yes, I just included two homemade grenadine recipes, just because I can’t decide which I like better – and grenadine makes so many things cheerier…. ;) )

Traditional Corned Beef from Nourishing Joy

Corned Beef Tongue from Nourishing Joy

How to Make Bresaola from And Here We Are

Yes You Can: Cure and Smoke Your Own Ham! from And Here We Are

Need to preserve your food? Here are links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired)!

Flower Honey

Lavender, rosemary, and rose are especially lovely in this application.

1 cup flower petals
1 pound honey

Add the flower petals to a reusable tea bag or bundle in cheesecloth, then add to honey. Leave in a sunny place for 1 week, then check flavor. Leave longer if desired. When ready, remove the petal bag and use. Will last at least 1 year in a cool, dark place.

Flower-Scented Sugar

2 cups granulated sugar, preferably whole cane sugar
1 cup flower petals, chopped finely

Stir sugar and flowers together and let sit for 1 week. Use as a finishing or rimming sugar. Will last at least 1 year in a cool, dark place.

Flower Syrup

1 cup water
3 cups whole cane sugar
1 cup flower petals
2 tablespoons vodka (optional)

Boil water, sugar, and flower petals together for 10 minutes until syrupy, then strain, stir in vodka if using, pour into a clean jar or bottle, and store in the refrigerator. The mixture will last two weeks without the vodka and up to two months with it. Use as you would use any other syrup.

 

Oil Curing

Wild Mushroom Butter from Nourished Kitchen

Homemade Sun Dried Tomatoes in Olive Oil from Scordo

Need to preserve your food? Here are links to 100+ recipes to help get you started (and inspired)!

Vinegar & Alcohol

Quick & Easy Plum Wine from And Here We Are

Save Those Stems! Make Strawberry Vinegar! from And Here We Are

Making Pontack Sauce (Elderberry Ketchup) from And Here We Are

How to Preserve Culinary Herbs, Wild Plants, and/or Fruit in Vinegar from Healthy Green Kitchen

Fruit Vinegar: The Easiest Way to Preserve Summer Fruit from The Kitchn

How to Make Brandied Cherries from Nourished Kitchen

Sweet Pickle Relish from Nourishing Joy

How to Preserve Jalapeño Peppers from Jalapeño Madness

Cauliflower Refrigerator Pickles from Keeper of the Home

How to Make Hard Cider From Whole Apples, Without a Press from And Here We Are

How to Make Pickled Eggs from Little House Living

 

Pickled Bamboo Shoots

1 fresh cooked bamboo shoot
pinch of sea salt
1/3 cup mirin or rice vinegar
1/4 cup whole cane sugar
2 teaspoons fermented fish sauce (optional)

Slice the cooked bamboo into matchsticks and set aside.

Place the mirin, salt, and sugar in a small pan and heat until sugar is dissolved, stirring occasionally.

Once sugar is dissolved, simmer uncovered and without stirring until mixture is slightly reduced, about 5 minutes.

Remove pickling syrup from the heat, stir in fish sauce, and toss with the prepared bamboo.

Let cool and store in the refrigerator for 2-3 weeks or in the freezer for up to six months. Thawed bamboo will be slightly mushy, but can certainly still be used in stirfries and other dishes.

Here’s where YOU can share YOUR favorite preserving resources! If there’s an article, tutorial, recipe, or resource you otherwise find inspirational, please link it up in the comments below.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. When you buy through our links, we earn a small commission, which helps to keep this site going so that we can continue to offer free and useful content, so thanks!