I suppose “rustic” is just a fancy way of saying that I make mashed potatoes with the skins on. Why keep the skins, you ask? Not only does it make the name sound fancier, it also makes for a more nutritious mashed potato. The skins house most of the nutrients in the humble potato! Here's our family's favorite real food rustic roasted garlic mashed potatoes – perfect for any meal, especially the holidays.

I suppose “rustic” is just a fancy way of saying that I make mashed potatoes with the skins on. Why keep the skins, you ask? Not only does it make the name sound fancier, it also makes for a more nutritious mashed potato. The skins house most of the nutrients in the humble potato, including:

  • vitamin B6
  • vitamin C
  • potatssium
  • iron
  • zinc
  • phytonutrients
  • fiber

I suppose “rustic” is just a fancy way of saying that I make mashed potatoes with the skins on. Why keep the skins, you ask? Not only does it make the name sound fancier, it also makes for a more nutritious mashed potato. The skins house most of the nutrients in the humble potato! Here's our family's favorite real food rustic roasted garlic mashed potatoes – perfect for any meal, especially the holidays.

In fact, that fiber is especially helping for slowing down the quick carbohydrate burst that comes from starchy potatoes, making them easier on your body and especially your blood sugar with the skin left on. That, and the fact that I really dislike peeling potatoes, so claiming better nutrition seems like an easy out. Just kidding. Mostly. (And seriously, if y’all really hate potato skins, then just peel them and carry on with the recipe. It won’t hurt my feelings.) You may also note that my recipe contains butter, whole milk and sour cream, and I still consider it to be healthy. It’s too long to go into here, but I firmly believe that our bodies need good, old-fashioned saturated fats from dairy just like great-grandma grew up on. The source matters, and so I choose grass-fed and raw as much as possible, but the most important thing is sticking with traditional, and not modern, fats!

Rustic Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Recipe type: Side Dish
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • 5 lbs potatoes (I prefer a yellow or red potato, but anything is fine), chopped into large chunks. If you're keeping the skins on, I recommend organic.
  • 1 tsp sea salt (or to taste)
  • ½ stick (1/4 cup) butter -- grass fed is ideal, as is raw/cultured
  • 1 cup dairy -- I like to use ½ cup sour cream (or creme fraiche) with ½ cup whole, raw milk. But you could use all milk, all sour cream, buttermilk, etc.
  • 1-2 heads of roasted garlic cloves, minced or pressed (personally, we like more than less– I put two whole heads of garlic, about 16 cloves, into mine!)
Dairy-Free Variation:
  • Substitute coconut oil for the butter. Instead of using milk and sour cream, you could use a mixture of chicken broth and coconut milk, or just omit the coconut milk and use all chicken broth (but you won’t want quite as much, since it is thinner than dairy). This will give it a rich flavor and you probably won’t even miss the dairy.
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat oven to 400 F. Put a large pot of water on to boil (I use a small stockpot).
  2. This is what the garlic look like after being roasted. See how I’ve opened them by cutting off just the tips?

  3. Snip the top off the garlic head(s) (but leave the peel on). Put them on a tray or uncovered pan and let them roast in the oven for about 30 minutes, until soft and fragrant and the peels are brown on the edges.
  4. Boil the potatoes in their skins until they are soft enough to easily pierce with a fork (about 20-30 minutes). Don’t leave potatoes boiling or sitting in hot water longer than necessary, because they will develop more of a gluey consistency. Best to drain them straight away, even if you won’t get to them for a little while.
  5. Add the butter to the pot until melted. Add in sour cream (milk, creme fraiche, broth, etc.), milk, salt, and garlic. Using either a potato masher or a hand mixer, begin to mash the potatoes and mix in the butter. I don’t like mine super-smooth, but you can beat them until smooth if you like them that way. It helps to give it a few minutes to let the flavors shine, especially the garlic.

I suppose “rustic” is just a fancy way of saying that I make mashed potatoes with the skins on. Why keep the skins, you ask? Not only does it make the name sound fancier, it also makes for a more nutritious mashed potato. The skins house most of the nutrients in the humble potato! Here's our family's favorite real food rustic roasted garlic mashed potatoes – perfect for any meal, especially the holidays.

Looking for more delicious, real food recipes to fill up your Thanksgiving table?

progressive_600x500B Over the next few days, this fabulous group of bloggers will be sharing Thanksgiving-inspired recipes and ideas to help you enjoy a Real Food Holiday! Check out the hashtag #realfoodholiday for more inspiration!

What will you be serving for Thanksgiving this year?