Blogiversary Q&A: Round 4

 
Jo Ann asked: I do have a question…what would you recommend when it comes to cookware? I need some new pots and pans and would love to know your opinion on all that's out there.

Oh, that's a whole post or two in itself! I am in the process of replacing my cookware this past year or so. I've replaced my Teflon pots with a stainless steel set, and I've also been given my first cast-iron pan (though I still have several Teflon pans that I am seeking to replace). I love the enameled cast iron cookware that's getting more popular these days (though you have to know what's in the enamel coating), but I also think that a good stainless steel set works really well. For frying pans, stainless steel just sticks so badly (it does with pots, too, but you get better at using them the longer you have them), so I would really prefer to head in the direction of all cast-iron and get them well seasoned so that sticking isn't an issue. Anyways, this will have to get added to my list of posts to write!

Jeannine asked this: Question for you – if you soak
your grains, wouldn't the phytic acid end up in the soaking liquid that ultimately stays in the recipe? Just wondering if it really make a
difference nutritionally to do this. Thanks, and keep up the great work!

My understanding of the way that it works is that the phytic acid is neutralized (though not removed), so that it's no longer harmful to our bodies. So I suppose it is still there in the soaking liquid, but because of the soaking process it has been altered in such a way that it is fine to consume it. The rest of the difficult substances are broken down into simpler components so that they become absorbable and digestible. See this article, and this post, for better explanations than I can give!

Alison asked: When/how did you first encounter Reformed theology?

Our first exposure to Reformed theology began a little over two years ago, when we left our previous church and began attending the church we currently attend (not specifically because it was reformed, but God just led us there through a series of events). We were part of a membership class, where we were so blessed to dig deep into the doctrines of the church, and it was coming into contact with this solid, reformed theology that was a major part of our decision to stay and become members of the church. Understanding the Gospel through this lens has impacted our lives in indescribable ways. We are so grateful for the teaching that we have received.

Our church is part of a family of churches called Sovereign Grace, and the basic way that we have had the values or beliefs of the church explained to us is that they are essentially reformed in theology, with a significant charismatic dimension (meaning that we believe that the gifts of the Holy Spirit are still active in the Church today).

And yet another from Donielle: Does saying looney and tooney make
you laugh? I used to work at a bank and people would try and bring them
in to exchange and I giggled every time:-) (Totally no offense to
Canadians out there, we Americans have our own silly things.)

Nope, but I can see why it would make others laugh! Guess we're all just used to it. I got a good laugh out of this question, though, so thanks Donielle! If you come visit Canada, you might see some of our dollar stores, with names like Amy's Loonie Toonie Town. You've got to admit, it's a whole lot more fun to say than "I'm going to Dollar Tree this afternoon". :) Try it youself… "Loonie Toonie Town"… it just kind of rolls off the tongue, doesn't it?

About Stephanie Langford

Stephanie Langford has a passion for sharing ideas and information for homemakers who want to make healthy changes in their homes, and carefully steward all that they've been given. She has written three books geared to helping families live more naturally and eat real, whole foods, without being overwhelmed, without going broke and with simple meal planning. She is the creator of Keeper of the Home.

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Comments

  1. “Understanding the Gospel through this lens has impacted our lives in indescribable ways. We are so grateful for the teaching that we have received.”

    Amen! My husband and I, along with some other families, are in the beginning steps of getting a Sovereign Grace church plant in our area. I trust that God will allow everything to fall into place in His perfect timing.

    I thank God for your blog, as it has been such an encouragment to me.

    In Christ,
    Shayna

  2. Do you subscribe to ‘Wise Traditions’ journal from the Weston A Price foundation? I assume so since you use NT and are so well-informed on health issues. The latest volume had some great info on what types of cooking pots and pans to use based on keeping metals from leeching. Check it out at http://www.westonaprice.org/

    It also had a GREAT piece on making whole/healthy/grassfed food fit your budget!

  3. just a note on the stainless pots and pans.
    I have just bought some myself and am working out the problems with sticking. I pre heat the pan till a drop of water dances and rolls around like a ball, only then do you add the oil or butter.
    and with pancakes I also found that if I drop a little oil and rub it around the pan with a paper towel, it seasons the pan and then I only have to add a litle butter every once and a while.
    also, the pot and pans cook at a lower heat like 3 or 4
    I turn it up a little more to pre heat and then turn it down to cook.
    I am loving my pot and pans now.

  4. When the loonie came out it made sense to call it a loonie, as it has a loon on it (and you just have to add the ‘ie’ to make is sound good right?) But when the toonie came out I thought it was the most ridiculous thing to call it a toonie (it should really be two-nie.) But how long can one call it a ‘two dollar coin?’ Now I’m used to it but yes, it must sound ridiculous to Americans.

  5. Becca, I do make kombucha. And yes, I usually get two pancakes (I call them mushrooms, but they look like funny little pancakes, don’t they?). Sometimes though, I will get two that have sort of joined themselves together and I can’t separate them. Since I always seem to have extra mushrooms, if I get one that is strange, or if I ever make a batch that seems a bit odd, I just toss that mushroom and use one of my other ones the next time. I think as long as the kombucha tastes right, it’s not a problem. Does anyone else have any thoughts?

  6. Here’s another question: Do you make kombucha? I think the answer is yes, so another question, do you always get two “pancakes” when it’s done? It seems like often when I make it, I end up with 1 1/2 pancakes, or one super huge, thick pancake at the end. The taste of the tea is always the same, but the pancake multiplication is inconsistent. What do you think?

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  1. [...] a Canadian $2 coin, otherwise known as the Toonie (get it? Two-nie. Punny, huh?). I don't usually, but yes, I did giggle when I saw this picture and thought of how the little things do indeed add [...]