Lantern
Last week I read a comment on one of my favorite blogs, that I've been mulling over and can't quite get out of my head:

Say
that you rail and your rail with your children about all kinds of
things: drugs and rock music and Christian music and weak Christianity
and sugar and white bread and recycling and "??those"?? people and bad
literature and mud on their boots and dirty houses and vaccinations and
feeding babies and chocolate and vitamins and natural childbirth, how
will your children know which of these things is really important?
Maybe one day they find out that some Christians eat sugar and they are
nice lovely people who truly love the Lord but from hearing you day in
and day out he thought that anyone who ate sugar had a free ticket to
hell. Now every single thing you have tried to teach your child ever
has been undermined by your passionate intensity.

The
context was getting passionate about the small things, and losing sight
of an eternal perspective and remaining passionate about Jesus. I can
totally agree with this train of thought. At our church, we are often
exhorted to "keep the main thing the main thing", referring to the
Gospel of Jesus Christ remaining at the center of everything we do,
think and say .

This is crucial. If I get caught up on the bandwagon of nutrition or
frugality or environmentalism to such an extent that it overrides my
passion for Jesus and what He has done for me, then shame on me. I have
lost sight of that which is central to everything.

However, if in my zealousness to remain single minded in my
passions, I cease to approach life from a Biblical world view that says
all truth is God's truth, and that surely His ways can bring light and
life to all elements of living, then I am still missing out on
something major.

The writer of the post said that she can tend to "major on the
minors", and to that I can heartily add an amen, so can I. But if I am
not mistaken, my God is a God of redemption in all of the nooks and
crannies of life. While discussing this comment with my husband this
morning, he noted that God could have contained the entirety of the
Gospel in one sentence, one verse, and yet He has given us a Bible of
66 books, by different authors speaking to a myriad of different
issues. Clearly, God has a vested interest in the subtleties, and
perhaps, even the "minors".

In all of my teaching, training and passionate discourse with my
children, I want them to see first and foremost a woman who (at my very
core) has been redeemed by Grace, and who is both inwardly and
outwardly being transformed into the very image of Christ, seeking His
kingdom first. If they do not see this, then I have missed the mark
tragically.

But I also hope they see more than that… a woman who seeks to find
God's best in every situation, in every decision. A woman who is
passionately serving her Savior with an intensity that requires her to
pursue excellence, stewardship, self-control, discernment and prayerful
seeking of her Lord in every area, big and small. And I cannot believe
this will undermine my message but rather affirm that everything in my
life belongs to the One through whom all things exist.

Originally published January 2008